Natural Aphrodisiacs

The Aphrodisiac Secret

Sometimes as you start to get over 35 as a woman, your sexual appetite can go down a lot. That is a bit of a sad thing, as you want to continue to love sex and that connection to your partner, but you just don't feel it anymore. However, this ebook shows that there are ways that you can bring your sex drive back up. Many times however, those methods are through dangerous chemicals or injections, and can have harmful side effects to your body. However, there IS a super fruit that can actually change ALL of this, and give you back the sex drive and the general good outlook on life that you have missed. These fruits are outlined in this guide, as well as how to prepare and serve them so that they taste their very best. All of these fruits are sure to bring back your sense of sex drive and get you feeling better than ever before. Read more here...

The Aphrodisiac Secret Overview

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Contents: Ebook
Author: Meredith Shirk
Official Website: www.aphrodisiacsecret.com
Price: $19.00

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Highly Recommended

I usually find books written on this category hard to understand and full of jargon. But the writer was capable of presenting advanced techniques in an extremely easy to understand language.

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Herbs, Oils, and Other Aphrodisiacs

This eBook guide teaches you everything that you need to know about how to use natural oils and remedies to turn your partner on in a way that you never thought was possible. Natural remedies and herbs give you access to a world of pleasure that you never know was possible, and this eBook goes through almost every type, giving you the ability to use each one of them to the most powerful effect. You will learn the best herbs and oils to choose, how to choose the right plant for you and your partner. You will also learn the tips and tricks to use herbs safely, without endangering anyone in your ever-expanding search for pleasure. All it takes is the eBook guide, and you can use the best sort of love-making supplements every created: the all-natural kind! Read more here...

Herbs Oils and Other Aphrodisiacs Overview

Contents: Ebook
Author: Scott Harker
Official Website: www.natural-aphrodisiacs.org
Price: $11.97

Commercial exploitation

Animals have been hunted by humans not only for their meat but for parts of their bodies that are used to create medicines, love potions, and trinkets. Overhunting has caused the extinction of many species and brought a great many others to the brink of extinction. Examples include species of whales, slaughtered for their oil and baleen. The rhinoceroses of Africa are critically endangered, having been killed mainly for their horns. Sharks' fins, cruelly cut off of the live animal, are used in Asia as an aphrodisiac, and 75 shark species are now endangered.

Life History and Habits

Usually courtship precedes mating, which may take more than an hour to complete. The secretion of the male's tergal glands attracts the female into the appropriate position and serves as an aphrodisiac, allowing the male to mount and transfer a spermatophore. Surrounding the spermatophore produced by males of most Blattellidae is a layer of uric acid, which is subsequently eaten by the female and provides a source of nitrogen for use in ootheca construction. Cockroaches exhibit four types of reproductive strategy (1) oviparity (all families except Blaberidae), the eggs being enclosed in a leathery or horny ootheca that may be seen protruding from a female's genital chamber prior to deposition (2) false ovoviviparity (almost all Blaberidae and a few Blattellidae), the membranous ootheca being held internally within a brood sac during embryonic development (3) true ovoviviparity (seen in only four genera of Blaberidae), in which an ootheca is not formed, the eggs passing directly from...

Intraspecific Interactions

Males and females may undertake various types of precop-ulatory behavior before mating. These may involve the sensing of species-specific alkene aphrodisiacs related to cuticular hydrocarbons, as in aleocharine Staphylinidae. Males or females may stridulate as part of their behavioral repertoire. In Meloidae, a male will climb onto the dorsum of the female and antennate her head, palps, or antennae. In Eupompha meloids, the males draw the antennae of the females along a longitudinal sulcus on the male vertex (Fig. 49). Genitalic insertion by the male is successfully attempted only after antennation of the female. The passage of a nuptial gift of the highly toxic compound cantharidin has been incorporated into mating behavior in the pyrochroid fire beetles. In Neopyrochroa flabellata, the female samples an exudate from a transverse sulcus on the male vertex. If the exudate contains the terpenoid cantharidin (better known as the mammalian aphrodisiac Spanish fly), the male successfully...

Methyl Branched Alkanes

Twenty-one of the twenty-four cuticular hydrocarbons with known biological activity are methyl-branched alkanes (Nelson 1993). These were functioning as sex pheromones, kairomones and anti-aphrodisiacs. In the last 10 years the number of methyl-branched cuticular hydrocarbons suspected to be involved in chemical communication continues to grow e.g. colony recognition in Polistes wasps (Dani et al. 2001) and fertility signal in ants (Endler et al. 2004). Although numerous studies identified methyl-branched alkanes thought to be involved in various aspects of communication, it has been very difficult to prove this with bioassays. Synthesising these compounds is currently difficult and laborious. Furthermore, establishing the chirality of an isomer and subsequent synthesis of the correct isomer is difficult. However, the diversity of identified methyl-branched alkanes is far greater than any other group of cuticular hydrocarbons (Martin and Drijfhout, in press), since not only can the...

Box 43 Reception of communication molecules

Aphrodisiacs Danaus

Courtship (section 5.2), which involves co-ordination of the two sexes, may require close-up chemical stimulation of the partner with a courtship pheromone. This pheromone may be simply a high concentration of the attractant pheromone, but aphrodisiac chemicals do exist, as seen in the queen butterfly (Nymphalidae Danaus gilippus). The males of this species, as with several other lepidopterans, have extrusible abdominal hairpencils (brushes), which produce a pheromone that is dusted directly onto the antennae of the female, whilst both are in flight (Fig. 4.8). The effect of this pheromone is to placate a natural escape reaction of the female, who alights, folds her wings and allows copulation. In D. gilippus, this male courtship pheromone, a pyrrolixidine alkaloid called danaidone, is essential to successful courtship. However, the butterfly cannot synthesize it without acquiring the chemical precursor by feeding on selected plants as an adult. In the arctiid moth, Creatonotus...

Chemical defence in beetles and moths

Meloe and other blister beetles, like the Paederus, secrete cantharidin which is a toxic and dangerous substance. One of us (PJ), while collecting meloids near a dam in Sudan, got many beetles trapped under his shirt. He was covered with blisters and had a high fever during the whole night. People know that cantharidin has the reputation to be an aphrodisiac. It is remarkably toxic, and 100 milligrams are lethal to humans. There are many criminal cases of poisoning due to meloids and meloid powder given to humans. Thomas Eisner, in his recent book (2003), reports that French legionnaires in Algeria, in 1893, were poisoned by frogs that they had eaten,

Box 42 Reception of communication molecules

Moth Releasing Pheromones Diagram

Courtship (section 5.2), which involves co-ordination of the two sexes, may require close-up chemical stimulation of the partner with a courtship pheromone. This pheromone may be simply a high concentration of the attractant pheromone, but aphrodisiac chemicals do exist, as seen in the queen butterfly (Nymphalidae Danaus gilippus). The males of this species, as with several other lepidopterans, have extrusible abdominal hairpencils (brushes), which produce a pheromone that is dusted directly onto the antennae of the female, while both are in flight (Fig. 4.8). The effect of this pheromone is to placate a natural escape reaction of the female, who alights, folds her wings and allows copulation. In D. gilippus, this male courtship pheromone, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid called danaidone, is essential to successful courtship. However, the butterfly cannot synthesize it without acquiring the chemical precursor by feeding on selected plants as an adult. In the arctiid moth, Creatonotus gangis,...

Farming Insects For Their Products And Byproducts

Blister beetles are the major source of cantharidin, the active ingredient of Spanish fly. This chemical has been used to topically treat warts and can be ingested for its aphrodisiac properties. Acute renal failure and death can arise from overdosing on cantharidin. These findings have prompted the removal of cantharidin from use in the United States, but Chinese researchers have discovered that beetles (e.g., Mylabris phalerata and M. cichorii), long used in traditional medicines, contain antitumor properties. Researchers are attempting to balance the potential cancer-fighting properties with undesirable side effects by testing less toxic analogues of cantharidin.

Cockroaches

Female cockroaches produce sexual pheromones to which males respond, and males may produce aphrodisiac secretions to encourage the female. Mating occurs back to back, and sperm is transferred in a packet. The females lay up to 40 eggs, which are surrounded by a tough case that may be dropped, stuck to the ground, or carried around, partly projecting from the end of the cockroach's abdomen. Metamorphosis in these insects is incomplete.

Other Functions

The cuticular waxes may have important roles in preventing the entry of microorganisms and in chemical communication (i.e., they serve as semiochemicals). It has been suggested that the waxes may prevent adhesion of microorganisms or may be toxic to them. Cuticular hydrocarbons are also known to serve as contact sex pheromones, for example, in female Diptera and Blattella, attracting or inducing copulatory behavior in males, or serving as an aphrodisiac to keep the male in position until insemination has occurred (Schal et al., 1998). In termites, the cuticular hydrocarbon blend is highly specific and serves as a species-and or caste-recognition pheromone. (See also Chapter 13, Section 4.1.2.) Interestingly, some beetles that live in termite colonies produce the same hydrocarbon profile as the host, enabling them to remain unmolested in the nest. The species-specific nature of the lipids has been turned to advantage by some parasitic Hymenoptera who use these chemical cues (known as...

Pheromones

In the term sex pheromones are included chemicals that (1) excite and or attract members of the opposite sex (sex attractants), (2) act as aphrodisiacs, (3) accelerate or retard sexual maturation (in either the opposite and or same sex), or (4) enhance fecundity and or reduce receptivity in the female following their transfer during copulation.

Folk Medicine

Folk remedies for the treatment of the innumerable ailments that befall humans and their animals are found worldwide. Although less important than herbal remedies, insects play a role in the folklore of healing and drug use. One of the most well-known insect-derived folk medicines is cantharidin. This powerful vesicant is derived from dried blister beetles, particularly Lytta vesicatoria. Although cantharidin can be extremely toxic to humans, as recently as the early 1900s cantharidin was used to treat a variety of ailments such as asthma, epilepsy, warts, sterility, and bedwetting. In Europe, where the drug as well as the beetle is known as Spanish fly, powdered cantharidin was taken orally for its purported qualities as an aphrodisiac. Cossinus, a close friend of the Roman Emperor Nero, reportedly died when an Egyptian doctor gave him cantharis to drink for treatment of a skin disease. Although generally based on some empirical observation some time in the distant past, the validity...

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