Characters Of Bees

YELLOW-FACED and PLASTERER BEES Family Colletidae Identification: Jugal lobe in HW longer than submedian cell. Basal vein straight or nearly so. 2 (Hylaeinae) or 3 (Colletinae) submarginal cells. 1 subantennal suture below each antennal socket. Glossa short, bilobed or truncate.

Yellow-faced Bees, Subfamily Hylaeinae. Slender black bees, 10 mm. or less, usually with whitish or yellowish areas on face. 2 submarginal cells. Body relatively bare. These bees lack a pollen-collecting apparatus on the hind legs, and resemble small wasps; they can be recognized as bees by the branched body hairs. They are quite common, and nest in the ground or in various natural cavities. Our species belong to the genus Hylaeus.

Plasterer Bees, Subfamily Colletinae. More robust and hairy than Hylaeinae. Brownish, the abdomen banded with pale hairs. 3 submarginal cells. 2nd recurrent vein somewhat S-shaped. These bees are much less common than the Hylaeinae. They nest in the ground and line their galleries with a thin transparent film (hence the common name).

ANDRENID BEES Family Andrenidae

Identification: Jugal lobe in HW longer than submedian cell. 2 subantennal sutures below each antennal socket. Basal vein straight or nearly so. 2 or 3 submarginal cells. Glossa short but pointed; Nest in burrows in the ground, often in colonies, usually in areas of sparse vegetation.

Subfamily Andreninae. Most are dark brown to brownish black, 20 mm. or less. Marginal cell pointed, its apex on costal margin of wing. Usually 3 submarginal cells. This is a large and widely distributed group, and many species are quite common. Nests usually consist of a vertical tunnel in the ground, with lateral tunnels branching off this vertical tunnel.

Subfamily Panurginae. Most are reddish brown, 10 mm. or less. Marginal cell truncate. 2 submarginal cells. Stigma large. These bees are much less common than the Andreninae but are widely distributed.

Subfamily Oxaeinae (not illus.). Similar to Panurginae but with 3 submarginal cells, and stigma very small. This small group is restricted to the southwestern states.

HALICTID BEES Family Halictidae See also Pl. 16

Identification: Similar to Andrenidae but with only 1 subantennal suture below each antennal socket, and basal vein strongly arched.

These resemble the andrenids in nesting habits: sometimes large numbers nest close together, often so close that different bees may use the same passageway to the outside. Halictids vary from about 5 to 15 mm.; many are quite small. Most of

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