Minute Brown Scavenger Beetles

Family Lathridiidae

Identification: Shape distinctive: FW oval, widest at middle, pronotum and head progressively narrower, pronotum often nearly circular from above. FW with distinct rows of punctures. Antennal club 2- or 3-segmented, loose. Brown or black. Tarsi slender, 3-3-3, 2-3-3, or 2-2-3. 1-3 mm.

These beetles are fairly common and are usually associated with moldy material. Both adults and larvae occur in rotting vegetation, woodpiles, mammal nests, and sometimes on flowers; they are also found in warehouses, but are thought to feed on fungus and mold and not on stored products.

FRUITWORM BEETLES Family Byturidae

Identification: Elongate-robust, FW parallel-sided. Light brown to dark orange, with dense yellowish or grayish hairs. Antennal club 3-segmented. Tarsi 5-5-5. 3.5-8.0 mm.

Adults of the eastern species are common on flowers and

MYCETAEID FUNGUS BEETLES 179

foliage. Larvae feed on fruits of raspberry, blackberry, and related plants. Larvae of Byturus unicolor Say, the Raspberry Fruitworm, often seriously damage the fruit of raspberry. One western species has been reared from oak galls; adults of this species occur on oak foliage There are 5 species of byturids in the U.S.

MYCETAEID FUNGUS BEETLES Family Mycetaeidae Identification: Shape distinctive: FW ovaly widest at middle, margins of pronotum S-shaped and extending forward, partly enclosing head. Tarsi 4-4-4. Black or brown, often with red or orange markings. Shiny, not pubescent. Pronotum often with 2 grooves at base. Antennal club 3-segmented. 1-4 mm.

MYCETAEID FUNGUS B. FLAT GRAIN BEETLE FRUITWORM BEETLE

Members of this small family are found in decaying materials and on flowers, and are not common. One species occurs in granaries, where it feeds on fungus or mold, and may become a pest by spreading mold through the grain.

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