Tachycines asynamorus

Physical characteristics: The wingless bodies of greenhouse camel crickets are yellow-brown, spotted, and measure 0.5 to 0.7 inches (13 to 19 millimeters) in length. The legs and antennae are long and slender, giving them the appearance of a long-legged spider. They are very quick and capable of jumping long distances. Females have a long swordlike ovipositor.

Geographic range: Originally from the Far East (probably China), they are now found throughout the world, except in the polar regions.

Habitat: Wild populations once lived in caves, but now most are found in greenhouses and in homes in warm, humid cellars and basements.

Diet: They are omnivorous, feeding on a variety of plant and animal foods, including other insects and plants.

Greenhouse camel crickets are only active at night and spend their days hidden in crevices and under large objects. They are always found in groups. (Arthur V. Evans. Reproduced by permission.)

Behavior and reproduction: They are active only at night and spend their days hidden in crevices and under large objects. They are always found in groups.

Females lay their eggs in soil. When the larvae hatch they will join groups of older individuals.

Greenhouse camel crickets and people: They are sometimes a pest in greenhouses, eating young plants. They are a nuisance to people because they are quick, jump unpredictably, and resemble spiders.

Conservation status: This species is not endangered or threatened.

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