Uses In Medicine And Pharmacology

Decades ago, researchers showed that a gene in baculoviruses could be replaced through genetic engineering with genes for other proteins. When insect cells are infected with these modified viruses, the cultures can produce a large quantity of the protein. This technique—the baculovirus expression vector system—has facilitated a new use for insect cell cultures for the production of vaccines, growth factors, and other materials useful in medicine. Over 1800 articles have been published on the use of insect cells to produce various recombinant proteins.

See Also the Following Articles

Biotechnology and Insects • Genetic Engineering

Further Reading

Freshney, R. I. (2000). "Culture of Animal Cells: A Manual of Basic Technique." 4th ed. Wiley-Liss, New York.

King, L. A., and Possee, R. D. (1992). "The Baculovirus Expression System: A Laboratory Guide." Chapman & Hall, London.

Lynn, D. E. (1996). Development and characterization of insect cell lines. Cytotechnology 20, 3—11.

Lynn, D. E., and Hung, A. C. F. (1991). Development of continuous cell lines from the egg parasitoids Trichogramma confusum and T. exiguum. Arch. Insect Biochem. Physiol. 18, 99—104.

Maramorosch, K., and McIntosh, A. H. (eds.) (1994). "Insect Cell Biotechnology." CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.

Maramorosch, K., and Mitsuhashi, J. (eds.) (1997). "Invertebrate Cell Culture: Novel Directions and Biotechnology Applications." Science Publishers, Enfield, NH.

Shuler, M. L., Wood, H. A., Granados, R. R., and Hammer, D. A. (eds.) (1995). "Baculovirus Expression Systems and Biopesticides." Wiley-Liss, New York.

Smith, G. E., Fraser, M. J., and Summers, M. D. (1983). Molecular engineering of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus genome: Deletion mutations within the polyhedrin gene. J. Virol. 46, 584-593.

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