Weevils

Curculionidae. Spanish: Gorgojos

(General), picudos (Central America).

Portuguese: Gorgolhos.

Weevils are immediately recognized by their snout, an elongation of the anterior portion of the head, which carries the elbowed antennae at the sides and mouth-parts at the tip. The mouthparts include powerful mandibles used for drilling holes in seeds and nuts for feeding and oviposition.

The family is the largest of any in the animal or plant kingdom, with more than 50,000 species worldwide; there are at least 12,000 species in Latin America, and certainly many hundreds are still unknown to science (O'Brien and Wibmer 1981, 1982, 1984a, 19846). A considerable number of species are injurious to agriculture, among them the famous boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis). This weevil and close relatives are found throughout Middle America and parts of South America (Burke et al. 1986).

References

Burke, H. R., W. E. Clark, J. R. Cate, and P. A. Fryxell. 1986. Origin and dispersal of the boll weevil. Entomol. Soc. Amer. Bull. 32: 228-238.

O'Brien, C. W„ and G. J. Wibmer. 1981. An annotated bibliography of keys to Latin American weevils, Curculionidae sensu lato (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Southwest. Entomol. suppl. 2: 1-58. O'Brien, C. W„ and G. J. Wibmer. 1982. Annotated checklist of the weevils (Curculionidae sensu lato) of North America, Central America, and the West Indies (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Amer. Entomol. Inst. Mem. 34: 1-382. O'Brien, C. W., and G. J. Wibmer 1984a. An annotated bibliography of keys to Latin American weevils, Curculionidae sensu lato (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) (Supplement I). Southwest. Entomol. 9: 279-285. O'Brien, C. W„ and G. J. Wibmer. 19846. Annotated checklist of the weevils (Curculionidae sensu lato) of North America, Central America, and the West Indies—Supplement 1. Southwest. Entomol. 9: 286-307.

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