Crematogaster bicolor C laeviuscula C clara Fig 95c

Workers are 3.3-4 mm long and yellowish brown to brown.

Figure 9.5 Hymenoptera: Formicidae. (a) Crematogaster ashmeadi; (b) C. cerasi; (c) C. laeuiuscula; (d) C. lineolata; (e) Linepithema humile; (f) Forelius pruinosus; (g) Dorymyrmex insanus.

The head is shiny except for sculpturing on the cheeks and clypeus. The scape extends beyond the posterior border of the head. The mesoepinotal impression is strong, and the sides and dorsum of the thorax have fine sculpturing. Epinotal spines are long and divergent, straight, or occasionally curved. There are long, erect setae on the head and anterior part of the thorax. Nests in natural habitats are tree branches, rotten stumps, and logs. Indoors they nest in wood in houses and feed on sweets and meat. Natural food is honeydew, and live and dead insects. This species is native to North America and occurs from Indiana to New Jersey and south to Texas and Florida.

Crematogaster cerasi (Fig. 9.5b) Workers are 2.6-4 mm long and the head and thorax are reddish brown to almost black. The scape extends beyond the posterior border of the head.

The mesoepinotal impression is strongly defined, constricting the thorax. Epinotal spines are divergent, long and straight, or occasionally curved. The sides of the thorax are sculptured, and slightly opaque. Erect setae on thorax are normally confined to a small cluster on each pronotal shoulder. Nests in natural habitats occur in the ground beneath objects, and in rotting stumps and logs; habitats include open fields, pastures, marshes, and woods. Indoor nests are in wood in roof, siding, ceiling, and porch, and commonly in door and window frames. Nests may be in cavities in wood made by other insects. Winged forms emerge in June to November. Workers in large colonies may be aggressive and when disturbed emit an objectionable odor. They tend honeydew-producing insects, and feed on live and dead insects. This species is native to North America and occurs from southern Canada through the eastern Rocky Mountains to New Mexico and east to Georgia.

Acrobat ant, Crematogaster lineolata (Fig. 9.5d) Workers are 2.5-3.5 mm long and yellowish brown to brown to blackish brown. The vertex of the head and around the eyes may be punctate. The scape extends beyond the posterior border of the head. The promesonotum with longitudinal grooves and with punctures, and sides of thorax are sculptured. Erect setae on the dorsum of the thorax are coarse or bristlelike. Epinotal spines are long and divergent. The pubescence on the body is short and close to the body. Nests are in soil or in logs and stumps of dead trees; they may nest in burrows of wood-infesting wasps. Workers bite aggressively, and give off an odor when alarmed. Winged forms emerge from June to September. Indoors they nest in woodwork. Natural food is honeydew, and live and dead insects; indoors they feed on sweets and meat. This species is native to North America, and occurs from southern Canada south along the Rocky Mountains and east to Florida.

Crematogasterscuteiiaris Workers are 4-5 mm long and dark brown. Antennae are 11-segmented, and the scape does not extend to the posterior border of the head. Nests in natural habitats areabove ground and usually in trees and tree stumps. It is frequently introduced to northern Europe with cork from southern Europe and North Africa; it occurs in and around warehouses and cork factories in the UK.

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